It's Because I'm Young

I'm a firm believer in Individuality don't let the masses dictate your viewpoints approach life with an open mind and heart, Also I do not own any of these pictures unless I say i do, Feel Free to ask questions,post opinions in my Ask Box, Ignorance can only be killed with an Open Mind

micdotcom:

16-year-old Jada’s rape was turned into a meme — but she and her supporters are fighting back

Jada’s case shares an eerie similarity to last year’s Steubenville rape case. That incident, too, involved the assault of a teenage girl, and that case, too, saw photos and videos of the unconscious girl spread like wildfire across the Web.

But unlike the Steubenville case, to which the reactions ranged from disturbing to downright egregious, Jada’s story is receiving an overwhelming outpouring of support. While the initial purpose of #jadapose was to make a mockery of a young girl’s sexual assault, her supporters have come out in droves to back her.

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(via godswithinus)

Being black affected one’s life span, insurance rates, blood pressure, lovers, children, every dangerous hour of every dangerous day. There was absolutely no way not to be black without ceasing to exist. But it frequently seemed that there was no way to be black, either, without ceasing to exist.

James Baldwin. Every Good-Bye Ain’t Gone.  New York. Dec 19, 1977.  (via homonoire)

Malcolm [X] was one of the most beautiful and one of the most gentle men I met in all my life. He asked the boy a question which I now present to you: If you are a citizen, why do you have to fight for your civil rights? If you’re fighting for your civil rights, that means you’re not a citizen. In fact, the legality of this country has never had anything to do with its former slaves. We are still governed by the slave codes.

—James Baldwin on Malcolm X, 1979. (via disciplesofmalcolm)

(Source: c-span.org, via disciplesofmalcolm)

You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read.

—James Baldwin (via books-foreverandalways)

gradientlair:

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968). 

Two quotes to share; the first is from Letter From Birmingham Jail

I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action’; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a ‘more convenient season.’ Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.

Who wants to take bets on which Whites are going to reblog this and remove the quote, as he’s regularly misquoted, made a meme and used by them to silence Black people? :)

I also love this, something James Baldwin wrote about him:

The secret of his greatness does not lie in his voice or his presence or his manner, though it has something to do with all these; nor does it lie in his verbal range or felicity, which are not striking; nor does he have any capacity for those stunning, demagogic flights of the imagination which bring an audience cheering to its feet. The secret lies, I think, in his intimate knowledge of the people he is addressing, be they black or white, and in the forthrightness with which he speaks of those things which hurt and baffle them. He does not offer any easy comfort and this keeps his hearers absolutely tense. He allows them their self-respect—indeed, he insists on it.

Rest in peace. 

It took many years of vomiting up all the filth I’d been taught about myself, and half-believed, before I was able to walk on this earth as though I had a right to be here.

— James Baldwin (via gentlerecovery)

dynamicafrica:

Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977) 
Today would’ve been Biko's 66th birthday had he not been murdered by the Apartheid police in South Africa from injuries he sustained after being tortured whilst in custody in Pretoria.
RIP

“Black Consciousness is in essence the realization by the black man of the need to rally together with his brothers around the cause of their oppression.” - Steve Biko

dynamicafrica:

Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977) 

Today would’ve been Biko's 66th birthday had he not been murdered by the Apartheid police in South Africa from injuries he sustained after being tortured whilst in custody in Pretoria.

RIP

“Black Consciousness is in essence the realization by the black man of the need to rally together with his brothers around the cause of their oppression.” - Steve Biko

studioafrica:

Steve Biko was a pioneering anti-apartheid activist and founder of the Black Conscious Movement. His writing and activism inspired, empowered and mobilised South Africa’s black population in the fight against minority rule. 

Black Consciousness as defined by South African Students Organization (SASO) in 1972:

ii. the basic tenet of Black Consciousness is that the Black man must reject all value systems that seek to make him a foreigner in the country of his birth and reduce his basic human dignity

iii. The Black man must build up his own value systems, see himself as self-defined and not defined by others

iv. The concept of Black Consciousness implies the awareness by the Black people of power they wield as a group, both economically and politically and hence group cohesion and solidarity are important facets of Black Consciousness

On this day 36 years ago - September 12 1977 - Biko was killed by the apartheid state - dying, like many black South Africans, in police custody. Biko’s activism and thought have continued to inspire and influence people and politics around the world.

Click through the images above for captions - and through the Steve Biko Online Archive

blackqueenepiphany:

apurvalman:

Sikhism: a religion from the Vedic family of religions, which includes Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and more.
Islam: a religion from the Abrahamic family of religions, which includes Christianity and Judaism.
Both are very DIFFERENT religions; however one thing that’s constant is that both religions DO NOT ENDORSE NOR PROMOTE TERRORISM OR VIOLENCE.
Please educate yourself before making any stupid remarks. Thank you.
Please reblog and share.


Like forreal yal forreal

blackqueenepiphany:

apurvalman:

Sikhism: a religion from the Vedic family of religions, which includes Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and more.

Islam: a religion from the Abrahamic family of religions, which includes Christianity and Judaism.

Both are very DIFFERENT religions; however one thing that’s constant is that both religions DO NOT ENDORSE NOR PROMOTE TERRORISM OR VIOLENCE.

Please educate yourself before making any stupid remarks. Thank you.

Please reblog and share.

Like forreal yal forreal

(via adreamdeferred)